Facts about the animal kingdom

Where Does the Pink Dolphin Live?

 
Nick A. Romero
By Nick A. Romero, Biologist and environmental educator. March 13, 2023
Where Does the Pink Dolphin Live?

The pink dolphin, also known as the Amazon dolphin or boto, is a species of freshwater dolphin known for its characteristic pink coloration, which comes from capillaries near the surface of the skin. As its name suggests, the pink dolphin is found mainly in the Amazon River. It is the largest species of river dolphin and is considered one of the most socially complex and intelligent dolphins in the world.

The following AnimalWised article provides an overview of the pink dolphin's habitat, as well as many other interesting facts.

Contents
  1. What is the Amazon River dolphin or pink dolphin?
  2. Distribution of the Amazon River dolphin or pink dolphin
  3. Habitat of the Amazon River dolphin or pink dolphin
  4. Protected areas of the Amazon River dolphin or pink dolphin

What is the Amazon River dolphin or pink dolphin?

The Amazon dolphin or boto is the largest of the river dolphins. Males grow up to 2.4 meters long and weigh up to 180 kilograms (400 pounds). They are also known for their characteristic dolphin smile and, unlike their marine relatives, their bulbous foreheads and long, thin beaks.

It is, however, their pink coloration that makes them most recognizable. The pink coloration comes from blood vessels called capillaries located near the surface of the skin. These capillaries contain hemoglobin, a protein that carries oxygen in the blood. The hemoglobin gives the blood a red color that appears pink when combined with the light reflected from the dolphin's water and skin.

Interestingly, not all Amazon River dolphins are pink. Some animals have a more grayish or brownish skin color, especially as they get older. The reasons for these differences in skin color are not well understood, but may be related to factors such as diet, genetics, or environmental conditions.

Scientists believe that the pink coloration of the Amazon River dolphin may have a social function. The lighter the pink, the more attractive the males are to the females. During the breeding season, when competition between males for access to females is at its highest, males were observed exhibiting aggressive behavior and using their pink coloration to signal their dominance over other males.

Pink dolphins are considered one of the most intelligent and socially complex dolphin species around. They have a range of vocalizations and are known for their acrobatic feats, which include flips and spins. Furthermore, most individuals live in family groups and others form larger social networks. In fact, they have been observed engaging in behaviors such as cooperative hunting, vocal imitation, and playing with objects.

Unfortunately, pink dolphins are threatened by habitat loss, pollution and hunting. They are classified as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Distribution of the Amazon River dolphin or pink dolphin

The pink dolphin can be found in the basins of two major rivers in South America, namely the Amazon and the Orinoco. It is widespread throughout several countries, including Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela.

These aquatic mammals are known to inhabit various parts of the rivers, from the river deltas near the source to the rapids, where boats cannot navigate. However, their movement may be limited by certain factors such as waterfalls, reduced water levels, and colder temperatures.

Let us take a closer look at where we can find the Amazon dolphin, depending on the country:

Brazil

  • Rivers and tributaries that flow through the states of Amazonas, Pará, Acre, Rondônia, and Mato Grosso.

  • The Mamirauá Sustainable Development Reserve, the Anavilhanas National Park, and the Araguaia River.

Bolivia

  • The Mamoré, Beni, and Iténez rivers, as well as the Manuripi-Heath Amazonian Wildlife National Reserve.

Colombia

  • The Amazon River, the Caquetá River, the Putumayo River, and the Vaupés River.

Ecuador

  • Yasuni National Park, the Cuyabeno Wildlife Reserve and the Napo River.

  • Brackish waters of the Gulf of Guayaquil and nearby estuaries, where the freshwater of the rivers mixes with the salt water of the Pacific Ocean.

  • The mangrove swamps and channels of the Churute Mangrove Ecological Reserve.

Perú

  • The tributaries Ucayali and Marañón, Napo, Tigre and Pastaza.

Venezuela

  • The Orinoco Delta, the Casiquiare Channel (which connects the Orinoco and Amazon basins), and the upper and middle Orinoco Rivers.

You may also be interested in this other article, where we describe the different species of river dolphins around the world.

Where Does the Pink Dolphin Live? - Distribution of the Amazon River dolphin or pink dolphin

Habitat of the Amazon River dolphin or pink dolphin

As we have seen, their habitat includes a range of aquatic environments, from fast-flowing rivers to seasonally flooded forests and lakes. Pink dolphins prefer shallow areas with sandy or muddy bottoms, and have been known to enter smaller tributaries and lakes. They are also found in areas with strong currents, such as rapids or estuaries, where they hunt for fish and other prey carried by the current.

During the rainy season, when rivers and floodplains are inundated, pink dolphins may enter areas normally inaccessible during the dry season. However, female pink dolphins and their young tend to stay in flooded forests and lakes because they provide better protection from the stronger currents in the main river channels.

Male pink dolphins, on the other hand, tend to stay in the main river tributaries during the rainy season. This may be because they are better adapted to the stronger currents and can swim more easily in these areas. In addition, the main river channels may provide males with better opportunities to find food and mate with females that may be passing through.

When the dry season arrives and the water recedes, the pink dolphins move away from the lakes and shallow areas and stay about 150 meters from the banks of the rivers and the places where they converge.

It is worth noting that pink dolphin migratory behavior may vary among populations and locations. Different populations may have different strategies to adapt to seasonal changes in water levels and other environmental factors.

Amazon River dolphins are adapted to navigate through narrow channels and shallow waters and have a more flexible neck than oceanic dolphins, which allows them to move their heads in different directions to navigate through complex environments.

Do not miss this other article where we go into more detail about the different characteristics of dolphins around the world, depending on species and habitat.

Where Does the Pink Dolphin Live? - Habitat of the Amazon River dolphin or pink dolphin

Protected areas of the Amazon River dolphin or pink dolphin

As mentioned before, the Amazon River dolphin is listed as "Endangered" on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. There are several threats to the pink river dolphin, including habitat loss and degradation, pollution, overfishing, and accidental entanglement in fishing gear. In some areas, hunting for their meat and oil is also a threat.

Numerous initiatives have been launched to protect the pink river dolphin, including the establishment of protected areas, as well as monitoring and research programs, and community education. Some of the most important protected areas of this species are:

  • Mamirauá Sustainable Development Reserve (Brazil): this reserve was established in 1996 and covers an area of over 1 million hectares in the Amazon basin. It is home to a large population of pink dolphins and other aquatic life.

  • Jaú National Park (Brazil): Located in the Amazon Basin, this park was established in 1980 and covers an area of more than 2 million hectares. It is one of the largest protected areas in Brazil and provides an important habitat for pink dolphins, jaguars and other species.

  • Pacaya Samiria National Reserve (Peru): This reserve was established in 1982 and covers 2 million hectares in the Amazon basin. It is home to a large population of pink dolphins and other aquatic life and is an important site for scientific research.

  • Cuyabeno Wildlife Reserve (Ecuador): this reserve was established in 1979 and covers an area of over 600,000 hectares in the Amazon Basin. It is home to diverse flora and fauna, including pink dolphins.

  • Manuripi-Heath Amazonian Wildlife National Reserve (Bolivia): This reserve was established in 1973 and covers over 1 million hectares in the Amazon basin. It is home to a large population of pink dolphins, as well as other endangered species.

These protected areas are essential for the conservation of the pink dolphin and its habitat, helping to ensure that this species continues to thrive in the wild. However, despite these efforts, ongoing threats to the species and its habitat indicate that further conservation action is needed to ensure the long-term survival of this unique species.

If you want to learn even more about dolphins, do not miss this other article, where we have listed some of the most interesting facts about dolphins.

If you want to read similar articles to Where Does the Pink Dolphin Live?, we recommend you visit our Facts about the animal kingdom category.

Bibliography
  • Bebej, R. (2006). Inia geoffrensis . Animal Diversity Web. Available at: https://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Inia_geoffrensis/
  • da Silva, V.; Trujillo, F.; Martina.; Zerbini, AN; Crespo, E.; Aliaga-Rossel, E.; Reeves, R. (2018). Inia geoffrensis . IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2018. Available at: https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2018-2.RLTS.T10831A50358152.en
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Where Does the Pink Dolphin Live?